Plant Life Balance

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If music is good for plants, and plants are good for people, and people like music… shouldn’t this happen more often?

Everyone grew a little when the Plant Life Balance event series, Plant Tales, presented ‘Plantasia’ last month at Rupert on Rupert in Collingwood. A strong showing of plant lovers (over 120 of you!) met in the lush, green space to talk all things plants and music and listen to a legendary interpretation of the recently re-released 1970s cult album ‘Plantasia’ by Sydney-based producer Anatole and projection artist Carla Zimbler.

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"It might sound weird, but really, it isn’t. Plants can hear. Their foliage tapping into the tunes and vibrations of the world around them. Us, nature, water, the harmonic waves of a song ringing through an atmosphere it lives and breathes. And just like plants take in carbon in a process invisible to the naked eye, those same plants will absorb surrounding sounds." Unbelievably excited to share our feature in @DumboFeather this week! Plant Life Balance lead researcher, Dr. Dominique Hes lifts the lid on the extraordinary relationship that plants have with sound and music and recounts the enthralling live performance of Plantasia with @Anatolemusic and @CarlaZimbler. Head to our bio to read the full story! 📸: @rosscorr

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The evening featured a panel which explored the playfulness between nature, music and the mind, attempting to answer some big questions, like how does music affect plants? And how do plants and nature inspire humans in return?

Dr Dominique Hes beautifully summarised the night that was earlier this month in Dumbo Feather – take a read of the extract below:

A hundred of us sit crossed legged on the floor of a calm, dimly lit foliage-filled room, completely enthralled by a live music performance by electronic producer, Anatole. Raised amongst the dramatic natural surroundings of the Blue Mountains Anatole shifts the space into a soundscape of surreal ecosystems; drawing on the grand cinematic scale of big ecosystems and the fine beauty in the minutiae of the smallest organisms of our vast Australian landscape. Meditative, emotive, uplifting and restorative, everyone in the room connected through their love of one thing: plants. 

I am reminded of how a plant listens. It might sound weird, but really, it isn’t. Plants can hear. Their foilage tapping into the tunes and vibrations of the world around them. Us, nature, water, the harmonic waves of a song ringing through an atmosphere it lives and breathes. And just like plants take in carbon in a process invisible to the naked eye, those same plants will absorb surrounding sounds. 

Plants have evolved in a world brimming with light and sound but it’s hard to picture them reacting to such stimuli as they don’t have the typical ‘brain’ we humans understand as a control room. Regardless, plants are listening. And just like humans, they like and dislike different sounds – or vibrations if you will, just as they too like different types of music. 

To read the full article, head to Dumbo Feather here

If you’re a Sydney-based plant-lover, there’s some exciting news for you – Plantasia is coming your way in just over a month. Keep your eyes peeled on the Plant Life Balance socials in the coming weeks to nab your tickets!

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